2021 Legislative Tracker

The below list of bills related to climate change, particularly adaptation, are being tracked by ARCCA as a resource to its members and adaptation professionals in California. Please note that descriptions are pulled directly from the bill text in the Legislative Counsel’s Digest without any analysis, and some descriptions only include a portion of the summary. If you are interested in a particular bill, we encourage you to follow the link (bill number) to read the full text.

Last updated:  Friday, April 9th at 8:00 AM PT

Jump to bill:  AB-9  AB-66  AB-67  AB-118 AB-125  AB-252 AB-284  AB-297  AB-350 AB-352 • AB-433 • AB-585  AB-642  AB-648 AB-880 •  AB-897  AB-976 AB-1087 AB-1384  AB-1445  AB-1500  SB-1  SB-12  SB-17  SB-45 SB-55  SB-63  SB-83  SB-99  SB-347  SB-359  SB-440  SB-449  SB-456  SB-552

Bill tracking progress bars

To help users visually see the status of each bill, ARCCA launched a new progress bar tracker under each bill that simplifies the legislative process into 10 key steps. However, it should be noted that the percentages used in the visual tracker do not correspond with the actual amount of time it takes for bills to move through the legislative process.

10% Introduction / First reading in the house of origin
20% Committee hearings
30% Second reading
40% Third reading
50% First reading in the other house
60% Committee hearings
70% Second reading
80% Third reading
90% Resolution of differences
100% To Governor to sign or veto

AB-9 (Wood) Fire safety: wildfires: fire adapted communities.

This bill would establish in the department the Regional Forest and Fire Capacity Program to establish support regional groups leadership to build local and regional capacity and develop, prioritize, and implement strategies and projects that create fire adapted communities by improving watershed health, forest health, community wildfire preparedness, and fire resilience. The bill would require, among other things, the department to, upon an appropriation by the Legislature, provide block grants to regional administrators, entities, as defined, to develop regional strategies that develop governance structures, identify wildfire risks, foster collaboration, and prioritize and implement projects within the region to achieve the goals of the program. The bill would authorize the department to, upon an appropriation by the Legislature, provide block grants to nongovernmental eligible organizations to support the statewide implementation of the program through coordination of and technical assistance to regional administrators, entities, as well as to support forest health and resilience efforts across regions and throughout the state. The bill would require, on or before July 1, 2022, the program director, in consultation with specified state entities, to review the regional capacity of each county that contains a very high fire hazard severity zone, as provided, to improve forest health, fire resilience, and safety, and would require the review to contain specified information. The bill would require the department to make this review publicly available on its internet website.

4/6/20 – Re-referred to Com. on NAT. RES. (Set for committee hearing on 4/14/21)30%
30%

AB-66 (Boerner Horvath) Coastal resources: research: landslides and erosion: early warning system: County of San Diego

This bill would appropriate from the General Fund the sum of $2,500,000 to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego Diego, to conduct research on coastal cliff landslides and erosion in the County of San Diego, as provided. The bill would require the research to be completed by January 1, 2024. 2025. The bill would require by no later than March 15, 2024, 2025, the institution to provide a report to the Legislature with recommendations for developing a coastal cliff landslide and erosion early warning system based on that available research. The bill would exempt the Regents of the University of California from civil liability for any harm related to the measurement, prediction, or warning of bluff failure, cliff landslides, or erosion while conducting the above-described research or related to the recommendations.

4/6/21 – Re-referred to Com. on APPR. (Set for committee hearing on 4/14/21)30%
30%

AB-67 (Petrie-Norris) Sea level rise: working group: economic analysis.

This bill would require a state agency to take into account the current and future impacts of sea level rise based on projections provided by the Ocean Protection Council when planning, designing, building, operating, maintaining, and investing in infrastructure located in the coastal zone zone, within the jurisdiction of the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission, or otherwise vulnerable to flooding from sea level rise or storm surges, or when otherwise approving the allocation of state funds funds, including, but not limited to, bonds, grants, and loans, for those purposes. The bill would provide that new or expanded infrastructure built pursuant to the above-described provision shall only qualify for state funds if the project is not anticipated to be vulnerable to sea level rise risks during the life of that project. The bill would provide that specified projects may be exempt from the above-described analysis so long as the project design is resilient to mid-century sea level rise projections provided by the Ocean Protection Council and consistent with relevant state and local agency policies. The bill would require, by March 1, 2022, the Ocean Protection Council, in consultation with the Office of Planning and Research, to establish a multiagency working group, consisting of specified individuals, on sea level rise to provide recommended policies, resolutions, projects, and other actions to address sea level rise, the breadth of its impact, and the severity of its anticipated harm. The bill would require the council, in consultation with the working group group, to, among other things, develop a standardized methodology and template for conducting economic analyses of risks and adaptation strategies associated with sea level rise, as provided. The bill would require a state agency to conduct a sea level rise analysis for any state-funded infrastructure project located in the coastal zone zone, within the jurisdiction of the commission, or otherwise vulnerable to flooding from sea level rise or storm surges, and restrict funding as needed, pursuant to that methodology. The bill would authorize the Controller to conduct audits of state agencies to and consult with working group member agencies, as necessary, to verify and ensure compliance with certain of the above above-described provisions.
4/6/21 – Re-referred to Com. on NAT. RES. (Set for committee hearing on 4/14/21)30%
30%

AB-118 (Kamlager) Emergency services: community response: grant program.

This bill would, until January 1, 2026, enact the Community Response Initiative to Strengthen Emergency Systems Act or the C.R.I.S.E.S. Act for the purpose of creating, implementing, and evaluating the 3-year C.R.I.S.E.S. Grant Pilot Program, which the act would establish. The bill would require the office to establish rules and regulations for the program with the goal of making grants to community organizations, over 3 years, for the purpose of expanding the participation of community organizations in emergency response for specified vulnerable populations. The bill would require that grantees receive a minimum award of $250,000 per year. The bill would require a community organization receiving funds pursuant to the program to use the grant to stimulate and support involvement in emergency response activities that do not require a law enforcement officer, as specified.

The bill would require the office to support an 11-member C.R.I.S.E.S. Committee, selected by the Governor, the Chair of the Senate Committee on Rules, and the Speaker of the Assembly, as specified, to be inclusive of community organizations with a proven history of leadership and partnership on emergency response.

The bill would also establish the Community Response Initiative to Strengthen Emergency Systems Program Fund in the State Treasury in support of the program, to be administered by the director.

4/7/21 – From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (April 5). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.20%
20%

AB-125 (Rivas) Equitable Economic Recovery, Healthy Food Access, Climate Resilient Farms, and Worker Protection Bond Act of 2022.

This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact subsequent legislation to issue a bond to support solutions to the climate crisis and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic that would create a more equitable and resilient food and farming system. enact the Equitable Economic Recovery, Healthy Food Access, Climate Resilient Farms, and Worker Protection Bond Act of 2022, which, if approved by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $3,122,000,000, pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law, to finance programs related to, among other things, agricultural lands, food and fiber infrastructure, climate resilience, agricultural professionals, including farmers, ranchers, and farmworkers, workforce development and training, air quality, tribes, disadvantaged communities, nutrition, food aid, meat processing facilities, fishing facilities, and fairgrounds.

3/22/21 – Re-referred to Com. on AGRI. (Set for committee hearing on 4/15/21)30%
30%

AB-252 (Rivas and Salas) Department of Conservation: Multibenefit Land Repurposing Incentive Program: administration.

This bill would require the Department of Conservation to establish and administer a program named the Multibenefit Land Repurposing Incentive Program for purposes of providing grants to groundwater sustainability agencies or counties, or other specified entities designated by groundwater sustainability agencies or counties, for the development or implementation of local programs supporting or facilitating multibenefit land repurposing at the basin scale. The bill would establish procedures for the department’s administration of the program and would require the department to develop guidelines to implement the program and to exercise its expertise and discretion in awarding program funds to eligible applicants. The bill would specify numerous criteria regarding program eligibility, including compliance with several specified requirements of SGMA. The bill would prescribe certain actions regarding program accountability and oversight, including preparation of an annual report with specified information evaluating the implementation of local programs and use of program funds.

3/30/21 – Re-referred to Com. on W.,P., & W.30%
30%

AB-284 (Rivas) California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006: climate goal: natural and working lands.

This bill would require the state board, when updating the scoping plan and in collaboration with the Natural Resources Agency and other relevant state agencies and departments, to take specified actions by January 1, 2023, including, among others, identifying a 2045 climate goal, with interim milestones, for the state’s natural and working lands, as defined, and identifying practices, policy incentives, market needs, and potential reductions in barriers that would help achieve the 2045 climate goal. The bill would require the state board, no later than January 1, 2024, to develop standard methods for state agencies to consistently track greenhouse gas emissions reductions, carbon sequestration, and additional benefits from natural and working lands over time.

3/25/21 – From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 8. Noes 1.)Re-referred to Com. on APPR.30%
30%

AB-297 (Gallagher, Bigelow, Dahle, Patterson) Fire prevention.

This bill would continuously appropriate $480,000,000 and $20,000,000 to the Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention and the California Conservation Corps, respectively, for fire prevention activities, as provided.

This bill would exempt from the requirements of CEQA projects or activities related to forest health and fuel reduction that involve thinning overgrown brushes or trees 10 inches or less in diameter by mechanical thinning, pile burning, prescribed fire, and grazing. Because a lead agency would be required to determine the applicability of this exemption, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

This bill would require the California Competes Tax Credit Committee, in determining whether to enter an agreement with a taxpayer, to give priority to a taxpayer whose project or business enhances forest health and resiliency by utilizing timber harvested in California, including materials from forest health and fuel reduction projects.

2/12/21 – Referred to Coms. on NAT. RES. and REV. and TAX.20%
20%

AB-350 (Villapudua) Agriculture: Cannella Environmental Farming Act of 1995: technical assistance grant program: groundwater conservation planning.

This bill would require, upon an appropriation of funds, the Department of Food and Agriculture to establish and administer a 3-year grant program to fund technical assistance to support landowners located in critically overdrafted basins, as defined, in the San Joaquin Valley in reaching water use reduction goals established pursuant to the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act. The bill would require the department, in its development of the grant program, to establish various criteria, guidelines, restrictions, processes and regulations for the qualification and administration of grants to technical assistance providers, as specified. The bill would require the grant program to fund one technical assistance provider in each of the 8 counties in the San Joaquin Valley. The bill would require the department to ensure that at least 25% of the grant program funds are used to provide technical assistance to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers, as defined. The bill would require that technical assistance from the grant program be provided directly to landowners in critically overdrafted basins to design, develop, and implement on-farm conservation plans for agricultural lands that are at risk of fallowing due to water shortages. The bill would require that grants awarded to technical assistance providers in each of the 8 counties in the San Joaquin Valley not exceed $100,000 in each year of the 3-year program, for a maximum of $300,000 per technical assistance provider. The bill would require the grant program not to exceed $800,000 in grant funds awarded per year.

This bill would make legislative findings and declarations as to the necessity of a special statute for the San Joaquin Valley because the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act will have a staggering effect on the San Joaquin Valley; a region that is comprised of approximately 5,000,000 acres of irrigated agriculture, which equates to over 20% of its local economy.

3/23/21 – Re-referred to Com. on AGRI. (Set for committee hearing on 4/15/21)30%
30%

AB-352 (Rivas) Agricultural land conservation: California Farmland Conservancy Program Act.

The bill would revise and recast provisions of the California Farmland Conservancy Program Act to, among other things, specify legislative intent to remove barriers to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers, as defined, participating in the agricultural economy and stewarding working lands under conservation. The bill would expand the use of moneys in the fund for the program to include technical assistance grants, as described, to eligible assistance entities, as defined, and acquisition assistance grants to eligible assistance entities for the sole purpose of reducing barriers to land access for socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers, as specified. The bill would require that not less than 25% of the program funds be provided to applicants that lease or sell to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers. The bill would also expand the conditions that an applicant must agree to for a grant for the acquisition of fee title to agricultural land to include, among other things, a farmer-purchaser preference, as defined, in the text of the agricultural conservation easement used to encumber the acquired property.

The bill would provide that grants made for land improvements may include the financial and technical involvement of the University of California Cooperative Extension and would revise the selection criteria for an agricultural conservation easement or fee title acquisition grant to, among other things, include whether the proposal reduces barriers to land access for socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers through ownership or long-term leases. The bill would delete the provisions relating to the termination of an agricultural conservation easement.

2/12/21 – Referred to Com. on AGRI.20%
20%

AB-433 (Chen, Lackey) California Wildfire Mitigation Financial Assistance Program: electrical utilities: voluntary contributions.

This bill would authorize the joint powers authority implementing the [wildfire mitigation program] to accept voluntary contributions and would require the contributions be deposited in the California Wildfire Mitigation Financial Assistance Fund, which the bill would establish in the State Treasury. The bill would provide that moneys in the fund are available, upon appropriation by the Legislature for purpose of the program.

4/1/21 – In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.20%
20%

AB-585 (Luz Rivas) Climate change: Extreme Heat and Community Resilience Program.

This bill would establish the Extreme Heat and Community Resilience Program to Program and would require the Office of Planning and Research to administer the program. Under the program, the bill would require the Office of Planning and Research to coordinate the state’s efforts to address extreme heat and to facilitate the implementation of regional local, regional, and state climate change planning into effective projects through the awarding of competitive grants to eligible entities for implementation of those projects. The bill would require the Office of Planning and Research to administer the program. The bill would establish the Extreme Heat and Community Resilience Fund in the State Treasury and would require the office, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to expend moneys in the fund for the implementation of the program.

3/25/21 – From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 9. Noes 0.)Re-referred to Com. on APPR. (Set for committee hearing on 4/14/21)40%
40%

AB-642 (Friedman) Wildfires.

This bill would require the [Director of Forestry and Fire Protection] to identify areas in the state as moderate and high fire hazard severity zones. The bill would additionally require the director classify areas into fire hazard severity zones based on additional factors including possible lightning caused ignition. The bill would require a local agency, within 30 days of receiving a transmittal from the director that identifies fire hazard severity zones, to make the information available for public comment. Because the bill would impose additional duties on local agencies, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

This bill would require, upon the identification of high fire hazard severity zones by the Director of Forestry and Fire Protection or by a local agency, the Office of the State Fire Marshal and the Department of Housing and Community Development to propose, and the commission to adopt, expanded application of the adopted fire protection building standards to high fire hazard severity zones. The bill would require the Office of the State Fire Marshal and the Department of Housing and Community Development to consider if it is appropriate to expand the application of the adopted fire protection building standards to moderate fire hazard severity zones.

This bill would require the [Department of Forestry and Fire Protection], on or before July 1, 2022, to develop a proposal to establish a prescribed fire training center. The bill would, on or before July 1, 2022, require the State Fire Marshal and the cultural burning liaison, which the bill would require the director to appoint, to develop a streamlined process to certify members of Native American tribes with cultural burning experience as burn bosses to recognize and account for their experience.

3/25/21 – From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 9. Noes 0.) (March 24). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.20%
20%

AB-648 (Fong) Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund: healthy forest and fire prevention: appropriation.

This bill would continuously appropriate, beginning in the 2021–22 fiscal year and ending in the 2028–29 fiscal year, $200,000,000 of the annual proceeds from the fund to the department for (1) healthy forest and fire prevention programs and projects that improve forest health and reduce greenhouse gas emissions caused by uncontrolled wildfires and (2) prescribed fire and other fuel reduction projects through proven forestry practices consistent with the recommendations of the California Forest Carbon Plan, including the operation of year-round prescribed fire crews and implementation of a research and monitoring program for climate change adaptation.

2/25/21 – Referred to Com. on NAT. RES.20%
20%

AB-880 (Aguiar-Curry) Affordable Disaster Housing Revolving Development and Acquisition Program.

This bill would, upon appropriation of the Legislature, establish the Affordable Disaster Housing Revolving Development and Acquisition Program to fund the predevelopment expenses, acquisition, construction, reconstruction, and rehabilitation of property to develop or preserve affordable housing in the state’s declared disaster areas that have experienced damage and loss of homes occupied by or affecting lower income households. The bill would require the department to administer the program. The bill would require the department to establish an application process for community development financial institutions, as defined, to apply for emergency short-term or temporary loans under the program.
This bill would require community development financial institutions receiving awards through the program to issue short-term loans to nonprofit housing development corporations, tribally designated housing entities, and local government agencies to fund the cost of developing dwelling units and transitional housing, childcare, after school care, and social service facilities that are integrally linked to the dwelling units, as specified. The bill would authorize certain cost categories related to the development of dwelling units, including the acquisition of real property, new construction or rehabilitation, general property improvements that are necessary to correct unsafe, unhealthy, or unsanitary conditions, and necessary and related onsite and offsite improvements.
2/25/21 – Referred to Com. on H. & C.D. (Set for committee hearing on 4/15/21)20%
20%

AB-897 (Mullin, Bennett, Quirk and Ward) Office of Planning and Research: regional climate networks: climate adaptation action plans.

This bill would authorize eligible entities, as defined, to establish and participate in a regional climate network, as defined. The bill would require the [Office of Planning and Research] to encourage the inclusion of agencies with land use planning authority into regional climate networks. The bill would authorize a regional climate network to engage in activities to address climate change, as specified.

This bill would authorize a regional climate network to develop a regional climate adaptation action plan, as described. The bill would require, by on or before July 1, 2022, the office to establish geographic boundaries for regional climate networks, and to develop and publish on its internet website guidelines on how eligible entities may establish regional climate networks and how governance boards may be established within regional climate networks. The bill would also require, on or before January 1, 2023, the office to develop and publish on its internet website guidelines, as prescribed, establishing how a regional climate network may develop a regional climate adaptation action plan, including certain information, analyses, and contents to be included in a plan and certain considerations and procedures for a regional climate network when preparing a plan.

This bill would require the office to provide technical assistance to eligible entities developing regions seeking to establish a regional climate network and to regional climate networks and in developing regional climate adaptation action plans. The bill would require, by July 1, 2022, on or before January 1, 2023, the office to make recommendations to certain policy and budget committees of the Legislature on developing state support for the work of regional climate networks, as prescribed, and the potential sources of financial assistance and options for distributing state funds to support the creation and implementation of regional climate adaptation action plans.

4/8/21 – Re-referred to Com. on NAT. RES. (Set for committee hearing on 4/14/21)30%
30%

AB-976 (Luz Rivas) Resilient Economies and Community Health Pilot Program.

This bill would establish the Resilient Economies and Community Health Pilot Program, which would be administered by the [Strategic Growth Council] from January 1, 2022, through December 31, 2026, as a grant pilot program for eligible community-based organizations, as defined, to provide a comprehensive suite of coordinated incentives and services to disadvantaged communities, as defined, at the resident household level to provide economic savings, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, and improve resiliency to the impacts of climate change. The bill would require the council to evaluate the program and submit specified reports to the Legislature on the program no later than January 1, 2026. The bill would repeal these provisions as of January 1, 2027.

3/25/21 – From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 8. Noes 0.) (March 24). Re-referred to Com. on APPR. (Set for committee hearing on 4/14/21)30%
30%

AB-1087 (Chiu) Environmental Justice Community Resilience Hubs Program

This bill would require the PUC to annually allocate 85% of the revenues received by the electrical corporations from that allocation of allowances. The bill would exempt from those revenues those portions attributable to retail residential customers that opt out and participants in the California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program or the Family Electric Rate Assistance (FERA) program, as specified. The bill would create the Environmental Justice Community Resilience Hubs Program, which would require each electrical corporation to award those allocated revenues as competitive grants to owners of critical community institutions and qualified housing for holistic community-driven building upgrade projects that demonstrate community engagement in all phases, demonstrate multistakeholder partnerships, reflect the geographic diversity of the state, and are installed on those properties. The bill would require the PUC to determine whether each electrical corporation or a third party, including the State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (Energy Commission), will administer those competitive grants, and would require each administrator to provide technical assistance to customers. The bill would prohibit more than 10% of those allocated revenues from being used for administration, technical assistance, and outreach. The bill would require the PUC to establish requirements relating to hiring, wages, apprenticeship programs, and workforce standards for the program, and would require certain grant recipients to agree to specified tenant protections. The bill would require the PUC, in consultation with the Energy Commission and the administrators, to ensure for greater cross-referral between eligible programs, as specified, share best practices, scale programming, establish a uniform application for multiple eligible programs, and provide comprehensive guidance and technical assistance for applicants to eligible programs.

3/4/21 – Referred to Coms. on U. & E. and NAT. RES.20%
20%

AB-1384 (Gabriel) Resiliency Through Adaptation, Economic Vitality, and Equity Act of 2022.

This bill would require the [Strategic Growth Council] to develop and coordinate a strategic resiliency framework that makes recommendations and identifies actions that are necessary to prepare the state for the most significant climate change impacts modeled for 2025, 2050, and beyond, among other goals. The bill would require state agencies identified in the strategic resiliency framework to collaboratively engage with regional entities to enhance policy and funding coordination and promote regional solutions and implementation and to proactively engage vulnerable communities whose planning and project development efforts have been disproportionately impacted by climate change, as provided. The bill would authorize the Treasurer, and the financing authorities that the Treasurer chairs, to assist state agencies by leveraging public and private capital investment to help with loans and other incentives to attain the goals identified in the strategic resiliency framework.

3/11/21 – Referred to Com. on NAT. RES. (Set for committee hearing on 4/14/21)20%
20%

AB-1445 (Levine) Planning and zoning: regional housing need allocation: climate change impacts.

This bill would require that a council of governments, a delegate subregion, or the department, as applicable, additionally consider among these factors emergency evacuation route capacity, wildfire risk, sea level rise, and other impacts caused by climate change.

3/11/21 – Referred to Coms. on H. & C.D. and L. GOV.20%
20%

AB-1500 (Eduardo Garcia and Mullin) Safe Drinking Water, Wildfire Prevention, Drought Preparation, Flood Protection, Extreme Heat Mitigation, and Workforce Development Bond Act of 2022.

This bill would enact the Safe Drinking Water, Wildfire Prevention, Drought Preparation, Flood Protection, Extreme Heat Mitigation, and Workforce Development Bond Act of 2022, which, if approved by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $6,700,000,000 pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law to finance projects for safe drinking water, wildfire prevention, drought preparation, flood protection, extreme heat mitigation, and workforce development programs.

This bill would provide for the submission of these provisions to the voters at the November 8, 2022, statewide general election.

3/11/21 – Referred to Coms. on W.,P., & W. and NAT. RES. (Set for committee hearing on 4/8/21)20%
20%

SB-1 (Atkins and Petrie-Norris) Coastal resources: sea level rise.

This bill would also include, as part of the procedures the [California Coastal Commission] is required to adopt, recommendations and guidelines for the identification, assessment, minimization, and mitigation of sea level rise within each local coastal program, as provided. The bill would delete the timeframe specified above by which the commission is required to adopt these procedures. The bill would require the commission to take into account the effects of sea level rise in coastal resource planning and management policies and activities, as provided. In addition, the bill would require state and regional agencies to identify, assess, and, to the extent feasible and consistent with their statutory authorities, minimize and mitigate the impacts of sea level rise. To the extent that a regional agency is a local public agency, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. This bill would add, as part of those goals, the goal of anticipating, assessing, planning for, and, to the extent feasible, minimizing and mitigating the adverse environmental and economic effects of sea level rise within the coastal zone.

This bill would create within state government the [Ocean Protection Council] the California Sea Level Rise State and Regional Support Collaborative. The bill would require the collaborative to consist of 5 members, as provided, including the Secretary for Environmental Protection and the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency. The bill would require the collaborative collaborative, among other things, to provide state and regional information to the public and support to local, regional, and other state agencies for the identification, assessment, planning, and, where feasible, the mitigation of the adverse environmental, social, and economic effects of sea level rise. rise, as provided. The bill would require, upon appropriation in the annual Budget Act, the collaborative to expend no more than $100,000,000 annually from appropriate bond funds and other sources for the purpose of making grants to local governments to update local and regional land use plans to take into account sea level rise and for directly related investments to implement those plans, as provided. The bill would require the Secretary for Environmental Protection and the Secretary of the Natural Resources Agency, as part of the adoption of the annual Budget Act, to annually appear before the budget committees of both houses of the Legislature regarding the implementation of the above provisions.

This bill would instead authorize the [Secretary for Environmental Protection] to expend up to $2,000,000 per year for purposes of the grant program and would require up to $500,000 of that money to be expended by the secretary for grants to organizations working to address and mitigate the effects of sea level rise in disadvantaged communities, as defined, impacted by sea level rise.

4/6/21 – Set for hearing April 12. (Com. on E.Q.)30%
30%

SB-12 (McGuire, Atkins, Caballero, and Dodd) Local government: planning and zoning: wildfires.

This bill would require the safety element, upon the next revision of the housing element or the hazard mitigation plan, on or after July 1, 2024, whichever occurs first, to be reviewed and updated as necessary to include a comprehensive retrofit strategy to reduce the risk of property loss and damage during wildfires, as specified, and would require the planning agency to submit the adopted strategy to the Office of Planning and Research for inclusion into the above-described clearinghouse. The bill would also require the planning agency to review and, if necessary, revise the safety element upon each revision of the housing element or local hazard mitigation plan, but not less than once every 8 years, to identify new information relating to retrofit updates applicable to the city or county that was not available during the previous revision of the safety element. By increasing the duties of local officials, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.

This bill would require a city or county that contains a very high fire risk area, as defined, upon each revision of the housing element on or after July 1, 2024, to amend the land use element of its general plan to contain, among other things, the locations of all very high fire risk areas within the city or county and feasible implementation measures designed to carry out specified goals, objectives, and policies relating to the protection of lives and property from unreasonable risk of wildfire. The bill would require the city or county to complete a review of, and make findings related to, wildfire risk reduction standards, as defined, upon each subsequent revision of the housing element, as provided. The bill would require the State Board of Forestry and Fire Protection to review the findings and make recommendations, as provided.

See more on this bill by reviewing the Legislative Counsel’s Digest.

4/6/21 – Set for hearing April 29. (Com. on HOUSING.)10%
10%

SB-17 (Pan) Office of Racial Equity.

This bill bill, until January 1, 2029, would establish in state government an Office of Racial Equity, an independent public entity not affiliated with an agency or department, that shall be governed by a Racial Equity Advisory and Accountability Council. The bill would authorize the council to hire an executive director to organize, administer, and manage the operations of the office. The bill would task the office with coordinating, analyzing, developing, evaluating, and recommending strategies for advancing racial equity across state agencies, departments, and the office of the Governor. The bill would require the office to develop a statewide Racial Equity Framework providing guidelines for inclusive policies and practices that reduce racial inequities, promote racial equity, address individual, institutional, and structural racism, and establish goals and strategies to advance racial equity and address structural racism and racial inequities. The bill would also require the office, in consultation with state agencies and departments, to establish methodologies, a system of measurement, and data needs for assessing how state statutes, regulations, and practices contribute to, uphold, or exacerbate racial disparities, and to prepare an annual report that evaluates and reports on progress in meeting statewide goals and policies established under the Racial Equity Framework.

The bill would require the Governor to direct the Secretary secretary of each state agency to adopt and implement the Racial Equity Framework through each agencies’ Racial Equity Action Plan, which would be adopted by each state agency and integrated into the agency’s strategic plan. The bill would require the office to provide technical assistance to agencies during development of the Racial Equity Action Plan, to review and approve each agency’s Racial Equity Action Plan, and to provide technical assistance to agencies implementing strategies for racial equity consistent with the Racial Equity Action Plan. The bill would require the Racial Equity Action Plan to be posted publicly on each agency’s internet website. The bill would require each agency to prepare an annual report on the agency’s progress towards goals set forth in the Racial Equity Action Plan and to submit the report to the office, the Governor, and the Legislature.

4/6/21 – Set for hearing April 13. (Com. on JUD.)30%
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SB-45 (Portantino, Allen, Hurtado, and Stern) Wildfire Prevention, Safe Drinking Water, Drought Preparation, and Flood Protection Bond Act of 2022.

This bill would enact the Wildfire Prevention, Safe Drinking Water, Drought Preparation, and Flood Protection Bond Act of 2022, which, if approved by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $5,510,000,000 $5,595,000,000 pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law to finance projects for a wildfire prevention, safe drinking water, drought preparation, and flood protection program.

This bill would provide for the submission of these provisions to the voters at the November 8, 2022, statewide general election.

4/8/21 – From committee with author’s amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on GOV. & F.30%
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SB-55 (Stern and Allen) Very high fire hazard severity zone: state responsibility area: development prohibition.

This bill would, in furtherance of specified state housing production production, sustainability communities strategies, greenhouse gas reduction, and wildfire mitigation goals, prohibit the creation or approval of a new development, as defined, in a very high fire hazard severity zone or a state responsibility area. area unless there is substantial evidence that the local agency has adopted a comprehensive, necessary, and appropriate wildfire prevention and community hardening strategy to mitigate significant risks of loss, injury, or death, as specified. By imposing new duties on local governments with respect to the approval of new developments in very high fire hazard severity zones and state responsibility areas, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

This bill would provide a qualifying developer a supplemental height bonus and a supplemental density bonus, as specified, if the development is located on a site that meets certain criteria, including, among others, not being located in a moderate, high, or very high fire hazard severity zone, as specified. By imposing additional requirements on local governments with respect to supplemental height and density bonuses, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

The bill would include findings that changes proposed by this bill address a matter of statewide concern rather than a municipal affair and, therefore, apply to all cities, including charter cities.

4/5/21 – From committee with author’s amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on GOV. & F.30%
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SB-63 (Stern) Fire prevention: vegetation management: public education: grants: defensible space: fire hazard severity zones: forest management.

This bill, among other things, would also require the director to identify areas of the state as moderate and high fire hazard severity zones and would require a local agency to make this information available for public review and comment, as provided. By expanding the responsibility of a local agency, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
This bill, among other things, would instead provide that fuel modification beyond the property line may only be required by state law, local ordinance, rule, or regulation in order to maintain the 100 feet of defensible space.

This bill would also require the Director of Forestry and Fire Protection to establish a statewide program to allow qualified entities, as defined, to support and augment the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection in its defensible space and home hardening assessment and education efforts and to establish a common reporting platform for participating qualified entities to report defensible space and home hardening assessment data to the department. The bill would repeal this provision on January 1, 2026.

This bill would require the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, under Good Neighbor Authority agreements entered into between the state and the federal government, as provided, to establish a program for purposes of conducting landscape scale ecological restoration and fire resiliency projects on national forest lands, including the development of specified federal and state environmental protection documents for landscape scale ecological restoration and fire resiliency projects on national forest lands that are at least 25,000 acres. The bill would authorize the department to contract with Native American tribes, local governments, forest collaboratives, and qualified nongovernmental organizations to conduct restoration activities on federal forest lands and to develop the federal documents.

3/26/21 – Set for hearing April 29. (Com. on HOUSING.)30%
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SB-83 (Allen) California Infrastructure and Economic Development Bank: Sea Level Rise Revolving Loan Program.

This bill would create the Sea Level Rise Revolving Loan Program within the I-Bank to provide low-interest loans to local jurisdictions for the purchase of coastal properties in their jurisdictions identified as vulnerable coastal property. The bill would require the California Coastal Commission, before January 1, 2023, in consultation with the California Coastal Commission, the State Lands Commission, and any other applicable state, federal, and local entities with relevant jurisdiction and expertise, to determine criteria and guidelines for the identification of vulnerable coastal properties eligible for participation in the program. The bill would authorize specified local jurisdictions to apply for, and be awarded, a low-interest loan under the program if the local jurisdiction develops and submits to the bank a vulnerable coastal property plan. The bill would require the California Coastal Conservancy to review the plans to determine whether they meet the required criteria for vulnerable coastal properties to be eligible for participation in the program.

The bill would establish the Sea Level Rise Revolving Loan Fund. The bill would authorize the I-Bank to issue bonds and require the bond revenues be deposited in the Sea Level Rise Revolving Loan Fund to be used for purposes of the Seal Level Rise Revolving Loan Program. The bill would also require that loan repayments, fees, and penalties be deposited in the revolving fund for specified uses including, upon appropriation by the Legislature, for additional loans authorized under the program. By authorizing the I-Bank to issue loans pursuant to the program, the bill would make an appropriation.

4/7/21 – April 15 hearing postponed by committee.20%
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SB-99 (Dodd) Community Energy Resilience Act of 2021.

This bill, the Community Energy Resilience Act of 2021, would require the commission to develop and implement a grant program for local governments to develop community energy resilience plans. The bill would set forth guiding principles for plan development, including equitable access to reliable energy, as provided, and integration with other existing local planning documents. The bill would require a plan to, among other things, ensure that a reliable electricity supply is maintained at critical facilities and identify areas most likely to experience a loss of electrical service.

The bill would require the commission to maintain a publicly available and searchable database of all local governments receiving grant funding pursuant to the program, including information on specific plan projects. The bill would require a local government, as a condition of receiving grant funding, to submit its plan and a report of project expenditures to the commission within 6 months of completing the plan. The bill would require the commission to annually report specified information about the grant program to the Legislature and post the report on its internet website.

3/26/21 – Set for hearing April 19. (Com. on E., U. & C.)20%
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SB-347 (Caballero) Urban forestry: California Tree Fund.

This bill would allow a taxpayer to designate an amount in excess of personal income tax liability to be transferred into the California Community and Neighborhood Tree Voluntary Tax Contribution Fund, which the bill would create. The bill would require the Franchise Tax Board to revise the tax return to include a space for this fund for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2021, and until January 1, 2028, unless the fund fails to meet an annual minimum contribution amount of $250,000, in which case these provisions would be repealed on December 1 of that year. The bill would require moneys transferred to the California Community and Neighborhood Tree Voluntary Tax Contribution Fund to be continuously appropriated and allocated to the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection to the grant program for urban forest management activities under the California Urban Forestry Act of 1978 and to the Franchise Tax Board and the Controller for related administrative costs, as provided. By continuously appropriating these funds, the bill would make an appropriation.

4/6/21 – Set for hearing April 19. (Com. on APPR.)20%
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SB-359 (Caballero) Climate change: natural and working lands.

This bill would, until ____, require the Department of Conservation to develop and implement the Resilient Merced County Incentive Pilot Program to assist the County of Merced to develop and adopt a climate action plan through the use of a scenario-planning tool developed by the department and provide financial assistance to private landowners in implementing activities resulting from the use of the scenario-planning tool set forth in the adopted climate action plan. The bill would specify that activities described above are eligible for incentives under the Sustainable Agricultural Lands Conservation Program, as provided. The bill would require the department, by ____, to submit to the Legislature a report on the results of the pilot program.

3/24/21 – Set for hearing April 15. (Com. on N.R. & W.)30%
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SB-449 (Stern) Climate-related financial risk.

This bill would require a bank, corporation, credit union, finance lender, insurer, investment advisor, real estate investment trust, and mortgage lender, as those terms are defined, to, before January 1, 2023, and annually thereafter, prepare a climate-related financial risk report, as defined, and to submit to the department, and make available to the public on its own internet website, a copy of that report. The bill would also require those financial institutions to submit to the department a statement affirming that the climate-related financial risk report discloses all climate-related financial risk. By expanding the scope of the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

This bill would also require the Governor to, before January 1, 2023, establish an advisory Climate Change Financial Risk Task Force to assess climate-related financial risk facing investors, corporations, banks, credit unions, mortgage lenders, insurers, and the state. The bill would require the task force to include certain members, including the Commissioner of Financial Protection and Innovation, the Treasurer, the Controller, and the Insurance Commissioner, and would require the task force to, among other things, annually prepare a report containing certain elements regarding climate-related financial risk reports.

4/6/21 – Set for hearing April 21. (Coms. on B. & F.I. and E.Q.)20%
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SB-440 (Dodd) Earthquake and wildfire loss mitigation.

This bill would require the Wildfire Fund Administrator, the Office of Emergency Services, and the Office of Energy Infrastructure Safety to create the California Wildfire Residential Loss Mitigation Program as a joint powers authority. The bill would require that program to provide mitigation against wildfire risk, including a grant program to assist qualifying owners to retrofit their structures to protect against wildfire or to create a defensible space around their structures. The bill would establish the Wildfire Loss Mitigation Fund as a continuously appropriated subaccount in the Wildfire Fund to fund the program. Because the bill would create a continuously appropriated fund, the bill would make an appropriation. The bill would require the council to annually set aside 5% or $10,000,000, whichever is less, of the Wildfire Fund’s investment income for deposit in the Wildfire Loss Mitigation Fund. Because certain of these provisions would be codified in the Public Utilities Act and would require action by the commission, a violation of which would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

3/22/21 – March 25 set for first hearing canceled at the request of author.10%
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SB-456 (Laird) Fire prevention: long-term forest management plans: reports.

This bill would require the department, on or before July 1, 2022, in consultation with various state entities, including the Office of Planning and Research, to establish a long-term forest management plan. The bill would require the plan to include the use of various programs, including fuels reduction and prescribed fire. The bill would require the office, on or before July 1, 2023, and annually thereafter, until July 1, 2033, to prepare a report and provide it to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee on the status of the long-term management plan, as provided. The bill would require the office, on or before July 31, 2033, to prepare a final report and provide it to the Joint Legislative Budget Committee regarding the long-range forest management plan over the previous 10 years, as provided.

3/25/21 – Set for hearing April 27. (Com. on N.R. & W.)20%
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SB-552 (Hertzberg) Drought planning: small water suppliers: nontransient noncommunity water systems.

This bill would require small water suppliers, as defined, and nontransient noncommunity water systems that are schools, no later than December 31, 2022, to develop and submit to the Division of Drinking Water for the state board an Emergency Response Plan that includes specified drought-planning elements. The bill would require these water systems to report specified water supply condition information to the state board through the state board’s Electronic Annual Reporting System, and to include water system risk and water shortage information in the water systems’ Consumer Confidence Reports, as provided. The bill would require the state board, in partnership with the department and no later than December 31, 2022, to conduct an assessment of drought and emergency water shortage resiliency measures for small water systems and nontransient noncommunity water systems that are schools, among other tasks.

This bill would require a county to establish a standing county drought and water shortage task force to facilitate drought and water shortage preparedness for state small water systems and domestic wells within the county’s jurisdiction, as provided, and include potential drought and water shortage risk and proposed interim and long-term solutions as an element in an existing county plan, as provided. Because the bill would impose additional duties on counties, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

This bill would require the department to take specified actions to support implementation of the recommendations from the County Drought Advisory Group. The bill would require the department to form a standing interagency drought and water shortage task force to facilitate proactive planning and coordinating, both for predrought planning and postdrought emergency response, which shall consist of various representatives, including representatives from local governments. Because the bill would impose additional duties on local governments, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

3/24/21 – Set for hearing April 13. (Coms. on N.R. & W. and GOV. & F.)20%
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