2022 Legislative Tracker

The below list of bills related to climate change, particularly adaptation, are being tracked by ARCCA as a resource to its members and adaptation professionals in California. Please note that descriptions are pulled directly from the bill text in the Legislative Counsel’s Digest without any analysis, and some descriptions only include a portion of the summary. If you are interested in a particular bill, we encourage you to follow the link (bill number) to read the full text.

Last updated: Monday, May 23rd at 11:30 PM PT

Jump to bill: AB-1384 • AB-1445 • AB-1640 • AB-1902 • AB-1939 • AB-1979 • AB-2076AB-2078AB-2225 • AB-2238AB-2287 • AB-2344AB-2362 • AB-2387AB-2419AB-2420 • AB-2442 • AB-2477AB-2479AB-2645AB-2649 • AB-2705 • AB-2805 • AB-2889 • SB-833 • SB-852SB-989SB-1049 • SB-1068SB-1077SB-1078 • SB-1123SB-1197SB-1205SB-1217

Bill tracking progress bars

To help users visually see the status of each bill, ARCCA launched a new progress bar tracker under each bill that simplifies the legislative process into 10 key steps. However, it should be noted that the percentages used in the visual tracker do not correspond with the actual amount of time it takes for bills to move through the legislative process.

10% Introduction / First reading in the house of origin
20% Committee hearings
30% Second reading
40% Third reading
50% First reading in the other house
60% Committee hearings
70% Second reading
80% Third reading
90% Resolution of differences
100% To Governor to sign or veto

AB-1384 | Gabriel
Resiliency Through Adaptation, Economic Vitality, and Equity Act of 2022.

This bill would instead require the [California Natural Resources Agency] to release the draft plan by January 1, 2024, and every 3 years thereafter, and to update the plan by July 1, 2024, and every 3 years thereafter. The bill would require the agency to also coordinate with the Office of Planning and Research and identify, among other things, vulnerabilities to climate change for vulnerable communities, an operational definition of “climate resilience” for each sector and for vulnerable communities, special protections of vulnerable communities and industries that are disproportionately impacted by climate change, opportunities to improve policy and budget coordination across jurisdictions, and timetables and specific metrics to measure and evaluate the state’s progress in implementing the plan. The bill would require each lead agency or group of agencies to be informed, at a minimum, by specified documents and climate science research in identifying the vulnerabilities to climate change. The bill would require state agencies to also maximize the objective of prioritizing equity by ensuring public expenditures that address climate change adaptation prioritize protecting vulnerable communities, rectifying intersectional and systemic inequities, and enhancing low-income and vulnerable communities’ abilities to weather the impacts of climate change. The bill would authorize the Treasurer, and the financing authorities that the Treasurer chairs, to assist state agencies by leveraging public and private capital investment to help with loans and other incentives to attain the goals established pursuant to these provisions.

4/19/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.80%
80%

AB-1445 | Levine
Planning and zoning: regional housing need allocation: climate change impacts.

Commencing January 1, 2025, this bill would require that a council of governments, a delegate subregion, or the department, as applicable, additionally consider among these factors emergency evacuation route capacity, wildfire risk, sea level rise, and other impacts caused by climate change. By adding to the duties of local officials in allocating regional housing need, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

5/04/22 – Referred to Com. on HOUSING.60%
60%

AB-1640 | Ward, Bennett, Mullin, and Quirk
Office of Planning and Research: regional climate networks: regional climate adaptation and resilience action plans.

This bill would authorize eligible entities, as defined, to establish and participate in a regional climate network, as defined. The bill would require [OPR], through [ICARP], to encourage the inclusion of eligible entities with land use planning and hazard mitigation planning authority into regional climate networks. The bill would authorize a regional climate network to engage in activities to address climate change, as specified. The bill would authorize a regional climate network to develop a regional climate adaptation and resilience action plan.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-1902 | Aguiar-Curry
Resource conservation: resource conservation districts.

This bill would also authorize a resource conservation district to be formed for the purpose of promoting and implementing programs, projects, practices, and activities on public and private natural, working, and urban lands to support achievement of California’s climate, conservation, and natural resources goals and objectives, as provided. The bill would also authorize a resource conservation district to, with the consent of the owner, construct on privately or publicly owned lands any necessary works for the protection, conservation, restoration, or enhancement of natural resources, the improvement or enhancement of adaptation or resilience to climate change, or the mitigation or sequestration of carbon emissions, and to develop and implement projects and programs for the conservation, enhancement, restoration, adaptation, and resilience of soil, water, and biodiversity and related natural resource conservation. The bill would authorize directors of the resource conservation districts to accept, administer, and manage specified projects and programs consistent with these purposes. The bill would authorize a resource conservation district to enter into an interagency agreement with a state agency, as provided.

5/19/22 – Read second time. Ordered to Consent Calendar.30%
30%

AB-1939 | Luz Rivas, Calderon, and Ward
Pupil instruction: science requirements: climate change.

This bill, with respect to both of the above-referenced adopted courses of study, would require the science area of study to include an emphasis on the causes and effects of climate change and methods to mitigate and adapt to climate change. The bill would require that appropriate coursework including this material be offered to pupils as soon as possible, commencing no later than the 2023–24 school year.

5/18/22 – Referred to Com. on ED.60%
60%

AB-1975 | Nazarian
Local government: bus shelters.

This bill would require each city, including a charter city, county, or city and county, to submit a report to the appropriate policy committees of the Legislature on or before January 1, 2024, and annually thereafter, that identifies the number of bus shelters within the local agency. By imposing additional duties on local agencies, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

The bill would repeal its provisions as of January 1, 2028.

The bill would include findings that changes proposed by this bill address a matter of statewide concern rather than a municipal affair and, therefore, apply to all cities, including charter cities.

5/19/22 – In committee: Held under submission.30%
30%

AB-1979 | Kalra
California Deforestation-Free Procurement Act: public works projects: wood and wood products.

This bill would establish the California Deforestation-Free Procurement Act. The bill would require a contractor, as defined, and specified subcontractors, for any contract entered into, extended, or renewed on or after January 1, 2025, contracting with a state agency for the procurement of any product comprised wholly or in part of forest-risk commodities to certify that the commodities were not grown, derived, harvested, reared, or produced on land where tropical deforestation occurred on or after January 1, 2023. The bill would exempt a credit card purchase of goods of $2,500 or less, not to exceed a total of $7,500 of goods per contractor per year, from these certification requirements. The bill would require specified contractors to have a forest policy, as specified, and would require the contractors to make the policy and corresponding data publicly available. On or before July 1, 2024, the bill would require the Department of General Services to make available an informational notice or memorandum on a Deforestation-Free Code of Conduct to be used by a contractor that includes specified information, including a list of forest-risk commodities subject to these provisions.

4/27/22 – In committee [Com. on A. & A.R.]: Set, first hearing. Held without recommendation.20%
20%

AB-2076 | Luz Rivas
Extreme Heat and Community Resilience Program: Extreme Heat Hospitalization and Death Reporting System.

This bill would establish the Extreme Heat and Community Resilience Program in the office, to be administered by the office through ICARP, for the purpose of coordinating state efforts and supporting local and regional efforts to prevent or mitigate the impacts of, and reduce the public health risks of, heat. The bill would require the Director of State Planning and Research to appoint a Chief Heat Officer in the office to, among other things, implement the program and establish the Interagency Heat Taskforce, as provided. Upon appropriation by the Legislature, the bill would authorize the program require the office, as part of the program, to award grants and provide technical assistance to eligible entities, as defined, for specified projects that support local and regional efforts to mitigate the impacts and reduce the public health risks of heat. The bill would require the office, in the awarding of grants, to prioritize projects that serve disadvantaged or vulnerable communities, as specified, that demonstrate participation in a regional climate collaborative program, or that are a component of a comprehensive heat action plan.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2078 | Flora
Atmospheric Rivers: Research, Mitigation, and Climate Forecasting Program.

The bill would, upon the appropriation of $10,000,000 from the General Fund funds for these purposes, require the [DWR] to research, develop, and implement new observations, prediction models, novel forecasting methods, and tailored decision support systems through science and technology advances, demonstration and integration into department operations, systems to improve predictions of atmospheric rivers and their impacts on water supply, flooding, post-wildfire debris flows, and environmental conditions. The bill would also require the department to take all actions within its existing authority to operate reservoirs in a manner that improves flood protection in the state and to reoperate flood control and water storage facilities to capture water generated by atmospheric rivers, thereby increasing water supply, hydropower availability, and the reliability of water resources in the state, and to consider refined climate projections of extreme weather and water events and changes in Sierra snow. rivers.

5/19/22 – In committee: Held under submission.30%
30%

AB-2225 | Ward
Resource conservation: traditional ecological knowledge: land management plans.

This bill would require the [Natural Resources Agency], on or before no later than January 1, 2024, to conduct a listening tour of regional workshops with Native American tribes across the state to solicit their initial the input, priorities, and concerns of Native American tribes regarding the state’s collection, acquisition, storage, and use of traditional ecological knowledge, as defined, and provide reimbursement to the tribes for this consultation, as provided. defined. The bill would require the agency, after completing the listening tour, but no later than January July 1, 2024, in consultation with the Governor’s tribal advisor, to adopt a policy for incorporating regarding the state’s collection, acquisition, storage, and use of traditional ecological knowledge into the conservation and management of lands owned or managed by the agency or the departments, boards, conservancies, or commissions under the agency, knowledge, as provided. The bill, among other things, bill would require, on and after January July 1, 2024, the agency and the departments, boards, conservancies, and commissions every department, board, conservancy, and commission under the agency to to, among other things, incorporate the policy of traditional ecological knowledge into land management plans for lands managed for conservation purposes, as provided. described above, including in guidelines for grant programs that offer land conservation or management funding.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2238 | Luz Rivas and Eduardo Garcia
Extreme heat: statewide extreme heat ranking system.

This bill would require [CalEPA], by January 1, 2024, to develop a statewide extreme heat ranking system in coordination with ICARP and the Department of Insurance, as provided. The bill would also require the department, by January 1, 2024, to submit a study of the insured and uninsured costs related to past extreme heat events to the appropriate legislative policy and budget committees, the agency, and ICARP. The bill would require ICARP to develop a public communication plan for the statewide extreme heat ranking system, recommend partnerships with, and develop statewide guidance for, local and tribal governments in the preparation and planning for extreme heat events, and recommend heat adaptation measures, as specified.

5/23/22 – Read third time. Passed. Ordered to the Senate.40%
40%

AB-2287 | Stone
California Ocean Resources Stewardship Act of 2000.

This bill would rename the trust to the California Ocean Science Trust and make conforming changes. The bill would authorize the trust to administer grants and expenditures of the trust for specified purposes from private and public fund sources, including, but not limited to, direct appropriations from the annual Budget Act and block grants from other state agencies with relevant need for coordination and engagement with the trust. The bill would exempt contracts with the trust for the sole purpose of delivering contracted science services to state agencies with relevant need, including, but not limited to, peer reviews, technical guidance, and scientific reports and analyses from state contracting requirements, as specified. The bill would repeal the provision requiring the secretary to report on the steps taken to ensure adequate coordination of ocean resource management science.

5/11/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2344 | Friedman and Kalra
Wildlife connectivity: transportation projects.

This bill would require DFW to investigate, study, and identify those areas in the state that are essential to wildlife movement and habitat connectivity and that are threatened by specified factors. The bill would require DFW, in coordination with Caltrans, to establish a wildlife connectivity action plan on or before January 1, 2024, and to update the plan at least once every 5 years thereafter.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2362 | Mullin
Ecosystem restoration and climate adaptation projects: permitting.

This bill would require the [Natural Resources Agency], on or before July 1, 2023, to evaluate existing state interagency collaborations functioning at the regional level to gain applicant and agency staff perspective on process and outcome efficiencies for issuing permits for proposed environmentally beneficial projects, as defined. The bill would require the agency to provide, at the request of an applicant for a permit for a proposed environmentally beneficial project, a voluntary preapplication consultation to the applicant that includes permit analysts from all state agencies with permitting authority over the proposed project, as provided. The bill would require the agency to prepare guidance for meeting statutory and regulatory permit requirements for proposed environmentally beneficial projects, as provided, and share that guidance with state agencies with permitting authority over proposed projects. The bill would require the agency to develop and administer an online permit portal that allows permit applicants for proposed environmentally beneficial projects to submit and track across all relevant state agencies permit application status information for proposed projects.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2387 | Eduardo Garcia and Mullin
Safe Drinking Water, Wildfire Prevention, Drought Preparation, Flood Protection, Extreme Heat Mitigation, and Workforce Development Bond Act of 2022.

This bill would enact the Safe Drinking Water, Wildfire Prevention, Drought Preparation, Flood Protection, Extreme Heat Mitigation, and Workforce Development Bond Act of 2022, which, if approved by the voters, would authorize the issuance of bonds in the amount of $7,430,000,000 pursuant to the State General Obligation Bond Law to finance projects for safe drinking water, wildfire prevention, drought preparation, flood protection, extreme heat mitigation, and workforce development programs. This bill would provide for the submission of these provisions to the voters at the June 7, November 8, 2022, statewide primary general election.

5/19/22 – In committee: Held under submission.30%
30%

AB-2419 | Bryan
Environmental justice: federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act: Justice40 Oversight Committee.

This bill would require a minimum of 40% of funds received by the state under the [Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act] and certain other federal funds to be allocated to projects that provide direct benefits to disadvantaged communities and and, except as specified, a minimum of an additional 10% be allocated for projects that provide direct benefits to low-income households and low-income communities, as provided. The bill would require state agencies administering those federal funds to perform specified tasks related to the expenditure of those federal funds.

This bill would establish the Justice40 Oversight Advisory Committee in the council, as provided, to perform various actions related to the expenditure of those federal funds. The bill would require the committee, by December 31, 2024, to provide an interim report, and by December 31, 2027, to provide a final report, a report to the Legislature, and to the council at a public meeting of the council, on various subjects related to the expenditure of those federal funds. that identifies certain recommendations it has developed, including recommending projects under any covered program for federal funding. The bill would require the council, by December 31, 2027, to submit a report to the Legislature on the expenditure of federal funds and an evaluation of the state agencies’ success in meeting the requirements of the bill. The bill would provide that those provisions would be repealed by their own terms on a specified date.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2420 | Arambula
Perinatal and infant children health: extreme heat.

This bill would, subject to an appropriation of funds by the Legislature in the annual Budget Act or another statute for this purpose, require the [State Department of Public Health], in consultation with subject matter experts, to review available literature on adverse effects of extreme heat on perinatal health, develop guidance for safe outdoor conditions and health considerations for pregnant individuals, individuals and infant children, and provide guidance to the Legislature by submitting a report that includes legislative or policy recommendations on best practices for connecting perinatal patients with the appropriate health and well-being information relating to extreme heat.

5/23/22 – Read third time. Passed. Ordered to the Senate.30%
30%

AB-2442 | Robert Rivas
Climate Change.

This bill would specify that mitigation measures for climate change and disasters related to climate, may include, but are not limited to, measures that reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, the preservation of open space, improved forest management and wildfire risk reduction measures, and other investments in natural infrastructure, as defined.

This bill would include climate change within the definition of disaster.

This bill would require the safety element to also include a set of feasible measures designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases resulting in climate change, and a set of measures designed to use natural features and ecosystem processes in or near identified at-risk areas threatened by the impacts attributable.

5/19/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2477 | Rodriguez
Local Emergency Preparedness, Hazard Mitigation, and Mutual Aid Fund.

This bill, on or before July 1, 2023, 2024, would require the [Office of Emergency Services], by regulation, to adopt minimum operating standards for private sector companies that provide alert and warning services to local entities and determine the appropriate thresholds for the provider of alert and warning services to report disruptions in service. Upon adoption of those regulations, the bill would require all providers of alert and warning services to notify the OES if a disruption in service or cybersecurity incident occurs. The bill would make the OES responsible for notifying any applicable county office of emergency services, the sheriff of any county, and any public safety answering point affected by the disruption of service. entities.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2479 | Wood
Forest restoration and protection: wildfire prevention.

This bill would require all state agencies, when funding restoration efforts on natural and working lands, to prioritize restoration projects that have a permanent, enforceable mechanism to ensure that the project area will be managed in a manner that maintains the desired conditions and the value of the state’s investment. This bill would require [CALFIRE], on or before April 1, 2023, to provide to the relevant policy and fiscal committees of the Legislature a report that details how the department will increasingly implement prescribed burn projects to burn at least 100,000 50,000 acres annually by January 1, 2025, and how the state state, by January 1, 2030, will increasingly use, develop, implement, facilitate, and support prescribed burn, cultural fire, and managed wildfire projects to burn an unspecified number of acres by January 1, 2030. achieve the extent of beneficial fire outcomes consistent with historic fire frequencies and maintaining desirable fuel loads.

5/19/22 – In committee: Held under submission.30%
30%

AB-2645 | Rodriguez
Local emergency plans: integration of access and functional needs: community resilience centers.

This bill would require a county, pursuant to the above-described requirement to integrate access and functional needs into its emergency plan upon the the plan’s next update to its emergency plan, update, to address specific additional plan elements. The bill would require the plan, with regard to emergency sheltering, to ensure that local community resilience centers, as defined, are prepared to serve as community-wide communitywide assets during extreme heat events and other disasters, to designate available locations that may be necessary to provide respite to individuals during certain environmental emergencies, including, but not limited to, extreme heat, cold, or unhealthy air incidents, and to integrate sheltering plans to account for specified state grant programs relating to community resilience. The bill would require the plan, with regard to emergency evacuation, to integrate transportation and sheltering plans to account for local community resilience centers.

5/19/22 -Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

AB-2649 | Cristina Garcia and Stone
Natural Carbon Sequestration and Resilience Act of 2022.

This bill would declare the policy of the state to achieve a goal of removing at least 60,000,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent annually on or before December 31, 2030, and 75,000,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent annually on or before December 31, 2035, through the implementation of natural carbon sequestration actions and programs on natural, working, and urban lands. The bill would require, on or before July 1, 2023, the Natural Resources Agency, in coordination with its departments, the state board, and the department, to refine existing and establish new natural carbon sequestration pathways and strategies to guide specified agencies in developing and implementing programs to help the state achieve this goal. The bill would also require those and other designated agencies to expand existing and establish new natural carbon sequestration programs, as specified.

5/23/22 – Read third time. Passed. Ordered to the Senate.40%
40%

AB-2705 | Quirk-Silva
Housing: fire safety standards.

This bill would prohibit the legislative body of a city or county from approving a discretionary entitlement, as defined, that would result in a new residential development project, as defined, being located within a very high fire hazard severity zone, unless the city or county finds that the residential development project will meet specified standards intended to address wildfire risks, as specified, and would provide that these provisions do not limit or prohibit a legislative body of a city or county from adopting more stringent standards. By imposing new requirements on cities and counties in the review of residential development projects, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

This bill, upon appropriation by Legislature and consistent with the above-described comprehensive wildfire mitigation program, would additionally require the State Fire Marshal, in consultation with specified state officials, to provide financial assistance to fire harden at least 300,000 existing vulnerable homes within the next 3 years in very high fire hazard severity zones and an additional 300,000 existing vulnerable homes every 3 years thereafter, as specified. The bill would require the State Fire Marshal to report back to the Legislature annually on the pace of fire hardening and what constraints impair the ability to realize the targets established by these provisions.

5/23/22 – Read third time and amended. Ordered to third reading.40%
40%

AB-2805 | Bauer-Kahan
Department of Fish and Wildlife: advance mitigation and regional conservation investment strategies.

This bill would require a regional conservation investment strategy, in order to create a mitigation credit, to include a framework an outline for adaptive management and monitoring of conserved habitat and a process to track and evaluate conservation actions and habitat enhancement actions of the strategy, as specified. The bill would authorize the department to approve a combination of mitigation credit agreements with other instruments or agreements for the purpose of creating mitigation credits, as provided. The bill would make various changes to provisions requiring the department to provide public notice before approving mitigation credit agreements. The bill would also authorize the use, sale, or transfer of mitigation credits established under a mitigation agreement approved by the department, regardless of the duration or expiration of the regional conservation strategy that establish those credits. The bill would remove provisions prohibiting the duplication or replacement of mitigation requirements set forth in an approved natural community conservation plan. The bill would repeal the prohibition on the department approving more than 8 regional conservation investment strategies.

5/23/22 – Read third time. Passed. Ordered to the Senate.40%
40%

AB-2889 | Wicks
Wildfire mitigation plans: electrical infrastructure: hardening.

This bill would additionally require an each electrical corporation with more than 50% of its service territory located in a high fire-threat district to additionally include in its 2023 wildfire mitigation plan, to prepare and submit to the office a multiyear undergrounding wildfire mitigation plan, covering at least 7 years and not more than 10 years, as specified. that includes, among other things, a methodology for identifying and prioritizing circuits for mitigation based on wildfire risk reduction, public safety, and reliability benefits, and a comparison of undergrounding versus aboveground hardening of electrical equipment. The bill would authorize the commission to use the approved multiyear wildfire mitigation plan during its review of the electrical corporation’s risk assessment mitigation phase filings or in consideration of the electrical corporation’s annual wildfire mitigation plan filings in a general rate case proceeding, as specified.

5/19/22 – In committee: Held under submission.30%
30%

SB-833 | Dodd
Community Energy Resilience Act of 2022.

This bill, the Community Energy Resilience Act of 2022, would require the [State Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission] to develop and implement a grant program for local governments to develop community energy resilience plans that help achieve energy resilience objectives and state clean energy and air quality goals. The bill would require a plan to, among other things, identify critical facilities, locations and facilities where the construction of microgrids or other distributed energy sources could meet local resilience needs, and potential funding sources for implementing projects in the plan, include a process for the expedited permit review of distributed energy resources by the local government, and demonstrate consistency with the city, county, or city and county general plan and other local government planning documents, as specified. As a condition of receiving grant funding, the bill would require a local government to submit its plan to the commission within 6 months of adopting the plan.

The bill would require the commission to maintain a publicly available and searchable database of all local governments receiving a grant, annually submit a program summary to the Legislature, and post the summary on its internet website. The bill also would require the commission to develop and maintain on its internet website a publicly available community energy resilience planning toolkit, a directory of prequalified consultants, and a resilience valuation index, as defined, to assist local governments in community energy resilience planning. The bill would require the commission to annually periodically update the index.

5/23/22 – Ordered to special consent calendar.30%
30%

SB-852 | Dodd
Climate resilience districts: formation: funding mechanisms.

This bill would authorize a city, county, city and county, special district, or a combination of any of those entities to form a climate resilience district, as defined, for the purposes of raising and allocating funding for eligible projects and the operating expenses of eligible projects. The bill would deem each district to be an enhanced infrastructure financing district and would require each district to comply with existing law concerning enhanced infrastructure financing districts, unless the district is specified as otherwise. The bill would require a district to finance only specified projects that meet the definition of an eligible project. The bill would define “eligible project” to mean projects that address sea level rise, extreme heat, extreme cold, the risk of wildfire, drought, and the risk of flooding, as specified. The bill would establish project priorities and would authorize districts to establish additional priorities.

This bill would impose certain requirements on a project undertaken or financed by a district. In this regard, the bill would require a district to obtain an enforceable commitment from the developer that contractors and subcontractors performing the work use a skilled and trained workforce, in accordance with specified provisions. These certifications would expand the crime of perjury, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program.

5/19/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

SB-989 | Hertzberg
Climate Change Preparedness, Resiliency, and Jobs for Communities Program: climate-beneficial projects: grant funding.

This bill would establish the Climate Change Preparedness, Resiliency, and Jobs for Communities Program, to be administered by the [Strategic Growth Council], and would require the council to fund grants to develop and implement multibenefit, community-level, climate-beneficial projects to support community and landscape resiliency and workforce development. The bill would require the council to award competitive grants to eligible entities, as defined, through an application process, as provided. The bill would require the council, on or before July 1, 2023, to develop guidelines to implement the program and criteria to select projects eligible for grant funding that include, at a minimum, specified information related to community resiliency grants, landscape resiliency grants, and climate and career pathways grants.

5/19/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

SB-1049 | Dodd
Transportation Resilience Program.

This bill would establish the Transportation Resilience Program in the Department of Transportation, to be funded in the annual Budget Act from 15% of the available federal National Highway Performance Program funds and 100% of the available federal Promoting Resilient Operations for Transformative, Efficient, and Cost-Saving Transportation program funds. The bill would provide for funds to be allocated by the California Transportation Commission for climate adaptation planning and resilience improvements, as defined, that address or mitigate the risk of recurring damage to, or closures of, the state highway system, other federal-aid roads, public transit facilities, and other surface transportation assets from extreme weather events, sea level rise, or other climate change-fueled natural hazards.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

SB-1068 | Laird
Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development: Climate change.

This bill would require GO-Biz to develop economic forecasts. The bill would require the economic forecasts to include climate impacts.
5/19/22 – May 19 hearing: Held in committee and under submission.20%
20%

SB-1077 | Bates
Coastal resources: Climate Ready Program: grants: nonnative and invasive plants: removal and restoration.

This bill would specifically authorize the conservancy to award grants to public agencies and nonprofit organizations that increase resilience of habitat and natural lands. The bill would require the conservancy, in awarding grants, as part of the prioritization of projects described above, to include those projects that accomplish the removal of nonnative and invasive plants from coastal features, habitats, and ecosystems, and their replacement with native species. plant species, upon appropriation. The bill would authorize the conservancy to consult, as needed, with the Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Invasive Species Council of California, and other entities in determining the invasive status of any species. The bill would appropriate $7,000,000 from the General Fund to the conservancy for purposes of providing grants through the program for the removal of nonnative and invasive plants and restoration of native plants, as provided.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

SB-1078 | Allen
Sea Level Rise Revolving Loan Pilot Program.

This bill would require [Ocean Protection Council], in consultation with [State Coastal Conservancy], to develop the Sea Level Rise Revolving Loan Pilot Program for purposes of providing low-interest loans to local jurisdictions jurisdictions, as defined, for the purchase of coastal properties in their jurisdictions identified as vulnerable coastal property property, as defined, located in specified communities, including low-income communities, as provided. The bill would require the council, before January 1, 2024, in consultation with other state planning and coastal management agencies, as provided, to adopt guidelines and eligibility criteria for the program. The bill would authorize specified local jurisdictions to apply for, and be awarded, a low-interest loan under the program from the conservancy, in consultation with the council, if the local jurisdiction develops and submits to the conservancy a vulnerable coastal property plan and completes all other requirements imposed by the council. The bill would require the conservancy, in consultation with the council, to review the plans to determine whether they meet the required criteria and guidelines for vulnerable coastal properties to be eligible for participation in the program.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

SB-1123 | Caballero
Resilience Navigators Program: climate change resilience financial assistance programs.

This bill would require the [Office of Planning and Research], on or before July 1, 2023, to establish within the program the Resilience Navigators Program to provide information and guidance to potential applicants for state programs that offer financial assistance, including grants or loans, to develop or implement plans, programs, or projects that seek to create, improve, or enhance resilience to climate change, including disasters associated with or amplified by climate change, including, but not limited to, wildfires and extreme heat. The bill would require the office to develop and maintain on its internet website or a related, state-administered internet website, and update annually, an interactive resource of all of these state programs, as specified, provide specified information and guidance to entities that are potential applicants for these programs, and conduct outreach to vulnerable communities, as defined, regarding available programs.

This bill would require the Natural Resources Agency, on or before July 1, 2024, and in coordination with the Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program and state entities represented in the California Climate Adaptation Strategy, to develop an interactive internet website that displays the state’s climate adaptation strategy, including the strategy’s priorities, goals, actions, metrics, timeframes, and lead agencies, as provided, and to develop coordinated, science-based approaches for measuring the performance and outcomes of state investments that support implementation of the state’s climate adaptation strategy, as provided.

5/23/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%

SB-1197 | Caballero
Water Innovation and Drought Resiliency Act of 2022.

This bill would create the Initiative to Advance Water Innovation and Drought Resiliency at [OPR] for the furtherance of new technologies and other innovative approaches in the water sector. The bill would require the office, as part of the initiative, to take specified measures on or before December 31, 2024, to advance innovation in the water sector. sector and ensure a drought-resilient economy. The bill would require the office to submit to the Legislature and post on its internet website a report detailing the actions taken as part of the initiative and recommendations for further actions.

The bill would further create the Water Innovation and Drought Resiliency Fund, with all moneys available, upon appropriation, to the office, the Department of Water Resources, the State Water Resources Control Board, or other state agencies for the furtherance of water innovation. The bill would require the Department of Finance to develop a standardized agreement to allow for voluntary donations to the fund by any person, educational institution, government entity, corporation or other business entity, or organization.

5/19/22 – May 19 hearing: Held in committee and under submission.30%
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SB-1205 | Allen
Water rights: appropriation.

This bill would require the board to develop and adopt regulations to provide greater specificity as to the methods and practices for determining water availability in the issuance and administration of water right permits and licenses, including consideration of the effects of climate change, as specified, upon watershed hydrology as part of the preparation of water availability analyses. The bill would require the board to consult with the Department of Water Resources, the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and qualified hydrologists and climate change scientists scientists, among others, in preparing the regulations.

5/19/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
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SB-1217 | Allen and Cortese
State-Regional Collaborative for Climate, Equity, and Resilience.

This bill would establish, until January 1, 2028, the State-Regional Collaborative for Climate, Equity, and Resilience to provide guidance, on or before January 1, 2024, to the state board for approving new guidelines for sustainable communities strategies. The collaborative would consist of one representative each of the state board, the Transportation Agency, the Department of Housing and Community Development, and the Strategic Growth Council, along with 10 public members representing various local and state organizations, as specified. The bill would require, on or before December 31, 2025, the state board to update the guidelines for sustainable communities strategies to incorporate suggestions from the collaborative.

5/19/22 – Read second time. Ordered to third reading.30%
30%
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