2024 Legislative Tracker

The below list of bills related to climate change, particularly adaptation, are being tracked by ARCCA as a resource to its members and adaptation professionals in California. Please note that descriptions are pulled directly from the bill text in the Legislative Counsel’s Digest without any analysis, and some descriptions only include a portion of the summary. If you are interested in a particular bill, we encourage you to follow the link (bill number) to read the full text.

To follow bills related to climate change and energy please follow the California Climate and Energy Collaborative (CCEC) legislative tracker here.

Last updated: Friday, April 12th at 2:05 PM PST

Jump to bill: AB-1195 AB-1819 AB-1889 AB-1922AB-1923 • AB-1992 • AB-2190AB-2214AB-2285 • AB-2286 • AB-2320AB-2684AB-3051SB-945 • SB-1029

Bill tracking progress bars

To help users visually see the status of each bill, ARCCA launched a new progress bar tracker under each bill that simplifies the legislative process into 10 key steps. However, it should be noted that the percentages used in the visual tracker do not correspond with the actual amount of time it takes for bills to move through the legislative process.

10% Introduction / First reading in the house of origin
20% Committee hearings
30% Second reading
40% Third reading
50% First reading in the other house
60% Committee hearings
70% Second reading
80% Third reading
90% Resolution of differences
95% Enrolled and presented to the Governor
100% Signed by Governor and chaptered into law

AB-1195 | Calderon
Climate Change Preparedness, Resiliency, and Jobs for Communities Program: climate-beneficial projects: grant funding

This bill would establish the Climate Change Preparedness, Resiliency, and Jobs for Communities Program, to be administered by the [Strategic Growth Council], and would require the council to fund grants to develop and implement multibenefit, community-level, climate-beneficial projects to support community and landscape resiliency and workforce development. The bill would require the council to award competitive grants to eligible entities, as defined, through an application process, as provided. The bill would require the council, on or before July 1, 2024, to develop guidelines to implement the program and criteria to select projects eligible for grant funding that include, at a minimum, specified information related to community resiliency grants, landscape resiliency grants, and climate and career pathways grants.

02/01/24 – From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.20%
20%

AB-1819 | Waldron
Enhanced infrastructure financing districts: public capital facilities: wildfires

This bill would additionally authorize an enhanced infrastructure financing district that are at least partially in high or very high fire hazard severity zones designated by the State Fire Marshal, as specified, to finance heavy equipment to be used for vegetation clearance and firebreaks, fortification of utilities against wildfires, and equipment used for fire watch, prevention, and fighting.

01/22/24 – Referred to Com. on L. GOV.20%
20%

AB-1889 | Friedman
Conservation element: wildlife and habitat connectivity

This bill would require a general plan to include a wildlife connectivity element, or related goals, policies, and objectives integrated in other elements, that considers the effect of development within the jurisdiction on fish, wildlife, and habitat connectivity, as specified. The bill would require the wildlife connectivity element to, among other things, identify and analyze connectivity areas, permeability, and natural landscape areas within the jurisdiction, incorporate and analyze specified guidelines and standards, incorporate and analyze relevant information from specified sources, and incorporate and analyze relevant best available science. The bill would require a city or county subject to these provisions to adopt or review the wildlife connectivity element, or related goals, policies, and objectives integrated in other elements, upon the adoption or next revision of one or more elements on or after January 1, 2025. This bill would additionally require the conservation element to consider the effect of development within the jurisdiction on the movement of wildlife and habitat connectivity. The bill would require the conservation element, upon the next update of one or more elements on or after January 1, 2026, to, among other things, identify and analyze connectivity areas, permeability, and natural landscape areas within the jurisdiction, identify and analyze existing or planned wildlife passage features, and consider the impacts of development and the barriers caused by development to wildlife and habitat connectivity. The bill would authorize a city, county, or city and county to incorporate by reference into their general plan an existing plan that meets these requirements. The bill would require a city, county, or city and county preparing to update its conservation element to consider incorporating appropriate standards, policies, and zoning, consult with specified entities, and consider relevant best available science. The bill would authorize a city, county, or city and county to consult with other appropriate entities and include the above-described required information in a separate component or section of the general plan entitled a wildlife connectivity element. 

04/11/24 – From committee: Amend, and do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on W., P., & W. (Ayes 8. Noes 1.) (April 10).30%
30%

AB-1922 | Davies and Rivas
California Conservation Corps: Green Collar Certification Program

This bill would require young adults participating in the [California Conservation Corps] program to be generally engaged in projects that, among other things, directly contribute to and promote the conservation of clean energy, enhance climate resilience, and develop sustainable climate infrastructure.

04/10/24 – In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.20%
20%

AB-1923 | Davies
Green Assistance Program

This bill would establish the Green Assistance Program within the California Environmental Protection Agency to, among other things, assist small businesses and small nonprofit organizations in applying for moneys from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund. The bill would authorize the Secretary for Environmental Protection to apply for and accept grants or contributions of funds from any public or private source for the program.

04/10/24 – In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.20%
20%

AB-1992 | Boerner
Coastal resources: coastal development permits: blue carbon demonstration projects

This bill would authorize the [California Coastal Commission] to authorize blue carbon demonstration projects, as defined, in order to demonstrate and quantify the carbon sequestration potential of these projects to help inform the state’s natural and working lands and climate resilience strategies. The bill would, among other things, authorize the commission to require an applicant with a project that impacts coastal wetland, subtidal, intertidal, or marine habitats or ecosystems to build or contribute to a blue carbon demonstration project.

04/10/24 – In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.20%
20%

AB-2091 | Grayson
California Environmental Quality Act: exemption: public access: nonmotorized recreation

This bill would exempt from [California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)] a change in use approved by a public agency to allow public access, as provided, exclusively for nonmotorized recreation, as defined, in areas acquired or managed by a public agency for open space or park purposes. The bill would require the lead agency, if the lead agency determines that an activity is not subject to CEQA pursuant to this provision and determines to approve or carry out the activity, to file a notice with the State Clearinghouse in the Office of Planning and Research and with the county clerk of the county in which the land is located, as provided. By imposing duties on public agencies related to the exemption, this bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2030.

04/01/24 – Re-referred to Com. on W., P., & W.30%
30%

AB-2190 | Mathis
California Environmental Quality Act: expedited judicial review: infrastructure projects: hydrogen

This bill would delete an exclusion from the definition of “energy infrastructure project” for these purposes any project using hydrogen as a fuel in the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This would authorize the Governor to certify energy infrastructure projects that use hydrogen as a fuel for streamlining benefits related to CEQA, such as the requirement that judicial actions, including any potential appeals, challenging the certification of an EIR or the granting of approval by a lead agency for certified projects be resolved, to the extent feasible, within 270 days after the filing of the certified record of proceedings with the court. Because the bill would impose additional duties on lead agencies in conducting the environmental review of energy infrastructure projects using hydrogen as a fuel that are certified by the Governor, including the concurrent preparation of the record of proceedings, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.

03/19/24 – In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.20%
20%

AB-2214 | Bauer-Kahan
Ocean Protection Council: microplastics

This bill would require, on or before March 1, 2025, the council to establish and lead an interagency coordination group group, and would require the council, in coordination with the interagency coordination group, to identify and recommend to the Legislature, on or before December 1, 2025, statutory changes that are needed to implement the recommendations described in the Statewide Microplastics Strategy, as specified. The bill would require the council, in coordination with the interagency coordination group, to adopt a workplan, on or before December 1, 2025, outlining who which participating agencies within the interagency coordination group will implement the recommendations. The bill would require the workplan to be provided to the Legislature on or before December 1, 2025. The bill would repeal these provisions on January 1, 2029.

04/09/24 – From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on E.S. & T.M. (Ayes 12. Noes 2.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on E.S. & T.M.30%
30%

AB-2285 | Rendon
Natural resources: equitable outdoor access: 30×30 goal: urban nature-based projects.

Existing law establishes the Equitable Outdoor Access Act, which sets forth the state’s commitment to ensuring all Californians can benefit from, and have meaningful access to, the state’s rich cultural and natural resources. Existing law declares that it is state policy, among other things, to ensure that all Californians have equitable opportunities to safe and affordable access to nature and access to the benefits of nature, and to prevent and minimize the intentional and unwarranted limitation of sustainable public access to public lands, where appropriate, including, but not limited to, local, regional, state, and federal parks, rivers, lakes, beaches, forests, mountain ranges, deserts, and other natural landscapes. Existing law requires specified state agencies to consider and incorporate, as appropriate, the state policy when revising, adopting, or establishing policies, regulations, or grant criteria, or making expenditures, as specified. Existing law requires all state agencies implementing the above-described state policy to do so in a manner consistent with the mission of their agency and that protects the health and safety of the public and conserves natural and cultural resources.

This bill would encourage provide that, to advance and promote environmental and conservation policies and budget actions, the Governor’s office, state agencies, and the Legislature, when distributing resources towards conservation and restoration goals during future budgetary deliberations, to ensure parity in allocations toward urban nature-based investments. The bill would provide that ensuring parity in allocations toward urban nature-based investments shall include consideration of, among other things, resources, shall aspire to recognize the coequal goals and benefits of the 30×30 goal and Outdoors for All, and would require consideration to include, among other things, higher land value acquisition and development costs per acre, the acute health needs of a local population due to historic lack of greenspace access and development externalities, local park needs assessment plans, and the availability of mobility options near a proposed land conservation site. The bill would encourage regulatory agencies, including the Department of Toxic Substances Control, to work with local communities to restore degraded lands that could contribute to a more equitable strategy for meeting the 30×30 goal. state’s goals. The bill would require state funding agencies, including certain state conservancies and the Wildlife Conservation Board, when programming and awarding funds to revise, modify, or amend guidelines as necessary to meet the 30×30 goal, state’s goals, to allow for urban nature-based projects on degraded lands to be eligible and competitive for state funds.

04/11/24 – From committee: Amend, and do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 14. Noes 0.) (April 9).30%
30%

AB-2286 | Aguiar-Curry, Friedman, and Kalra
Vehicles: autonomous vehicles

This bill would require a manufacturer of an autonomous vehicle to report to the department a collision on a public road that involved one of its autonomous vehicles with a gross vehicle weight of 10,001 pounds or more that is operating under a testing or deployment permit that resulted in damage of property, bodily injury, or death within 10 days of the collision.

The bill would require a manufacturer of an autonomous vehicle to annually submit to the department specified information regarding the deactivation of the autonomous mode for its autonomous vehicles with a gross vehicle weight of 10,001 pounds or more that were operating under a testing or deployment permit that authorized the vehicle to operate on public roads.

04/09/24 – Re-referred to Com. on TRANS.30%
30%

AB-2320 | Irwin
Wildlife Connectivity and Climate Adaptation Act of 2024: wildlife corridors

This bill would additionally require the [Natural Resources Agency], as part of [an annual report submitted to the Legislature] to identify key wildlife corridors, as defined, in the state, connections between large blocks of natural areas and habitats, progress on protecting additional acres of wildlife corridors, and goals for wildlife corridor protection in the next 5 years, as provided. The bill would also make related findings and declarations.

This bill would additionally require the , as part of that report, to identify key wildlife corridors, as defined, in the state, connections between large blocks of natural areas and habitats, progress on protecting additional acres of wildlife corridors, and goals for wildlife corridor protection in the next 5 years, as provided. The bill would also make related findings and declarations. This bill would additionally make it the policy of the state to preserve, protect, and restore wildlife habitats and biodiversity by acquiring and restoring large blocks of habitat and natural lands and the lands and infrastructure to provide wildlife corridors, as defined, and for connectivity of large habitat. The bill would require the  to identify priority projects for the acquisition, development, rehabilitation, restoration, protection, and expansion of wildlife corridors and open space, and would require the board to give priority to projects that protect wildlife corridors, including wildlife corridors threatened by urban development, as specified.

04/11/24 – Re-referred to Com. on NAT. RES.30%
30%

AB-2684 | Bryan
Safety element: extreme heat

This bill would require a city or county, upon the next revision of its local hazard mitigation plan on or after January 1, 2024, to review and update its safety element as necessary to address the hazard of extreme heat, as specified. The bill, after the initial revision of the safety element pursuant to these provisions, would require the planning agency to review and revise the safety element upon each revision of the housing element or local hazard mitigation plan to identify new information relating to extreme heat hazards and climate adaptation and resiliency strategies that was not available during the previous revision of the safety element.
The bill would include findings that changes proposed by this bill address a matter of statewide concern rather than a municipal affair and, therefore, apply to all cities, including charter cities.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

04/11/24 – From committee: Amend, and do pass as amended and re-refer to Com. on E.M. (Ayes 8. Noes 1.) (April 10).20%
20%

AB-3051 | Muratsuchi
Personal income taxes: voluntary contributions: California Climate Literacy Education Voluntary Tax Contribution Fund.

This bill, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2024, would allow an individual to designate on their tax return that a specified amount in excess of the taxpayer’s personal income tax liability be transferred to the California Climate Literacy K–12 Climate Change Education Voluntary Tax Contribution Fund. The bill would continuously appropriate the fund to the Franchise Tax Board and the Controller for administrative costs, and to the San Mateo County Office of Education for grants awarded to environmental education programs administered by local education agencies and county offices of education that promote environmental education and environmental literacy by providing teachers throughout the state with access to high-quality professional learning opportunities and education resources. To the extent the bill would impose additional duties on a county office of education, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery’s Office of Environmental Justice, Tribal Relations, Education and Outreach to award grants to school districts, county offices of education, resource conservation districts, district and county office of education partnerships with higher education institutions, and community-based nongovernmental organizations focused on environmental and climate change education, as specified. The bill would repeal these provisions on December 1, 2031, or on December 1 of the year that the minimum contribution amount of $250,000 is not met, whichever is earlier, as specified. By continuously appropriating these funds, the bill would make an appropriation.

04/09/24 – Re-referred to Com. on REV. & TAX.30%
30%

SB-945 | Alvarado-Gil
The Wildfire Smoke and Health Outcomes Data Act

This bill, the Wildfire Smoke and Health Outcomes Data Act, would require the State Department of Public Health, in consultation with the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, the Wildfire and Forest Resilience Task Force, and the State Air Resources Board to create, operate, and maintain a statewide integrated wildfire smoke and health data platform no later than July 1, 2026, that, among other things, would integrate wildfire smoke and health data from multiple databases. The bill would require the State Department of Public Health to develop the data platform in accordance with a to be specified schedule. Under the bill, the purposes for the data platform would include providing adequate information to understand the negative health impacts on California’s population caused by wildfire smoke and evaluating the effectiveness of investments in forest health and wildfire mitigation on health outcomes in California.

04/05/24 – Set for hearing April 17.30%
30%

SB-1029 | Min
Fire protection: Regional Forest and Fire Capacity Program: reports

Exiting law establishes in the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Conservation the Regional Forest and Fire Capacity Program (program) to support regional leadership to build local and regional capacity and develop, prioritize, and implement strategies and projects that create fire adapted communities and landscapes, as provided. Existing law authorizes the [Department of Forestry and Fire Protection] to, upon appropriation, provide block grants to specified entities for purposes of the program, as provided. Existing law, until July 1, 2025, authorizes the department to authorize advance payments on the above-described grants, as provided.

04/02/24 – Set for hearing April 15.30%
30%
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